Conference Follow-Up
(Last updated 9.18.01)
Thanks to all of our speakers and pariticpants for a truly successful and valuable event. Below you will find various downloadable files and links to additional information as part of our conference follow up. If you have any special requests or additional feedback on the event, please feel free to contact us either by phone (1-800-338-2223 or 781-891-8080) or via email (info@pharmcentric.com).

Follow-Up Items - Links and Downloads:

Conference Program Information
You can still get to the conference program information that was posted previously on our website, including the Agenda, Presentation Downloads, Brochure, related articles from Impact Reports, related articles from Product Development Best Practices Report, keynote descriptions, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ), the Advisory Board, our sponsors, as well as a follow up article.

Report on the conference, "Improving Cross-Functional Performance in Pharmaceutical Development"
"Reaping the Rewards of Empowerment," Preston G. Smith, Current Drug Discovery, July 2001, pp. 37-39. Report on the conference, "Improving Cross-Functional Performance in Pharmaceutical Development," which thus offers critical advice for enabling large cross-functional teams to function better. Download (3 pp., 69 KB).

Downloadable Presentations

Some of the conference presentations are available for download by conference participants only. To request a password, please call us at 1-800-338-2223 or via email at info@pharmcentric.com You must be verified as conference attendee to receive entry permission.

Enter Presentation Download Area

Related Articles from Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development Impact Reports

Volume 1
Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development Impact Report

Planning, independence, feedback keep global R&D projects on track
Successful project management links outcomes to strategic company goals
While R&D has always been the lifeblood of pharmaceutical companies, it takes on greater importance as innovation and product development-not cost containment-emerge as the long-term path to company growth. When growing public demand for quicker development of new drugs is added to the mix, the mandate for pharmaceutical firms is clear: no matter how effective R&D programs may have been to date, R&D productivity must improve.[more]

Volume 2
Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development Impact Report

Effective data use drives portfolio management and global strategies
Doing the right R&D-and doing it right-starts with corporate strategy
There probably is no more consequential issue within the pharmaceutical industry than effective portfolio management, for it is new compounds that will shape company growth. Even more to the point, effective portfolio management- which gives promising compounds the best chance to succeed-more than any-thing else, will determine company pipelines and market value over the next five years.[more]


Articles Related to the Conference Theme from Product Development Best Practices Report

Volume 6, Issue 3
Reprinted from Product Development Best Practices Report

UNTANGLING THE MEASUREMENT MESS
Fast Cycle Time author Christopher Meyer thinks most organizations are in the middle of a measurement mess. Meyer (who came up with the measurement "dashboard" concept a few years ago in his Harvard Business Review article, "How the Right Measures Help Teams Excel"), says that when most organizations, like Harley-Davidson, went through their reengineering periods in the 1980s, moving away from traditional command-and-control to distributed power and cross-functional teamwork, they often left their measurement systems largely untouched. [more]

Volume 4, Issue 2
Reprinted from Product Development Best Practices Report

THE CROSS-FUNCTIONAL MYTH
You are a traditional functional organization. You have had some success with cross-functional development teams, but the functional forces keep pulling things back to the status quo. The problem is that you know your cycle time is too long and that you're doing a sub-optimal job capturing customer input into product design. The best solution is to blow up your functional silos, put your strongest people into cross-functional teams, demand cross-functional cooperation at the senior level, and have all these cross-functional operators get as close as possible to your customer, right? Maybe not, says MIT associate professor of strategic management Rebecca Henderson. Do it and you may wake up to discover that you won the battle and lost the war, sacrificing long-term institutional strength to short-term victories in the marketplace
.[more]

Volume 4, Issue 2
Reprinted from Product Development Best Practices Report

EFFECTIVE R&D MEASUREMENT ONE OF THE KEYS TO SUCCESS AT HEWLETT-PACKARD
With $31.5 billion in sales, $2.4 billion in net revenue, more than 100,000 employees, and R&D costs that run almost 10% of net revenue, the folks at Hewlett-Packard need to manage a fascinating business dilemma: on the one hand they need to adhere to a disciplined measurement system, on the other they need to keep alive the tremendously strong intuitive capability that has been a hallmark of the CA-based company since its inception. Since measurement devices are one of their core product areas, along with computing systems and peripherals, and communications devices, it's no surprise that they are keenly aware of this.[more]

Brochure
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Agenda

Agenda-at-a-Glance
Improving Cross-Functional Performance
in Drug Development
May 14-15, 2001
|Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel|Philadelphia, Pa.

Monday, May 14, 2001 - Day One

10:00-1:00 p.m. Registration

1:00-1:15 p.m. Welcome and Introduction Conference Chairperson Kenneth I. Kaitin, Ph.D., Director Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development Tufts University, Boston, MA

1:15-2:45 p.m. Keynote Presentation
Winning at New Products: Creating & Launching Superior New Products, Dr. Robert G. Cooper, developer of the Stage-Gate process and co-author of Portfolio Management for New Products

2:45-3:15 p.m. Refreshment Break

3:15-4:45 p.m. Session I: Building and Maintaining Cross-Functional Teams
In this session the following topics will be examined:
Ÿ
Organizational structures
Ÿ
Matrix management
Ÿ
Dealing with conflict

4:45-5:30 p.m. Case Study on Organizational Structure - Dr. Charles T. Gombar, Senior Director, Project Management, Neuroscience, Wyeth-Ayerst

5:30-7:30 p.m. Cross-Functional Networking Reception

Tuesday, May 15, 2001 - Day Two

7:30 a.m. Continental Breakfast

8:30-9:30 a.m. Accelerating Time-to-Peak Sales: Leveraging Lessons Learned in Other Industries Preston G. Smith, New Product Dynamics, co-author, Developing Products in Half the Time: New Rules, New Tools

9:30-10:15 a.m. Pharmaceutical Case Study on Matrix Management - Pharmacia Corp.

10:15-10:45 a.m. Refreshment Break

10:45-12:30 p.m. Interactive Break Out Sessions

12:30-1:30 p.m. Luncheon

1:30-2:15 p.m. Case Study on Resource Management - Allan Wehnert, Divisional Director, Corporate Projects R&D, H. Lundbeck, A/S, Denmark

2:15-3:00 p.m. Session II: Monitoring and Tracking Cross-Functional Performance
In this session the following topics will be examined:
Ÿ
Resource forecasting
ŸBudgeting
Ÿ
Project management software

3:00-3:30 p.m. Refreshment Break

3:30-4:15 p.m. The Cross-Functional Transformation at IBM
Shakil Ahmed, Director, IPD Process Management, IBM Corporation

4:15-5:00 p.m. Case Study on Team Performance Metrics - Dr. Susan T. Hall, Operations Director, Metabolic and Musculoskeletal Product Development, Project Management and R&D Strategy, GlaxoSmithKline

5:00 - 5:15 p.m. Conference Summary and Closing Remarks, Janet Foulkes, Senior Director/Group Leader, MSO, Pfizer, Inc.

Keynotes

Keynote and Feature Presentations

Keynote Presentation:
Winning at New Products: Creating & Launching Superior New Products

Dr. Robert G. Cooper

There are two ways to win at new products. The first is by doing projects right.
Dr. Cooper outlines the 10 critical success factors in product innovation - factors that separate winning project teams from the rest - based on his extensive NewProd studies of successful versus unsuccessful new product ventures. These 10 success factors are then fashioned into a cross-functional game plan for success - a Stage-GateTM roadmap that charts the way from idea through to launch and integrates the key functions in the innovation process. (Cooper is developer of the Stage-Gate process, now employed by leading firms around the world to get new products to market quickly and effectively).

The second way to win is by doing the right projects. Cooper, co-author of the pioneering book, Portfolio Management for New Products, outlines best practices for project selection and portfolio management. A cross-functional method for project prioritization is essential if all involved departments are to have the same development priorities and rankings. This part of the talk is based on Cooper's recent study of leading firms' portfolio management methods.

The speaker: Dr. Robert G. Cooper is Professor of Marketing at McMaster University in Canada and also the ISBM Distinguished Research Fellow at Penn State University. He is a leading expert in the field of management of new products, and has won a number of awards for his writings and methods. He is also Crawford Fellow of the Product Development & Management Association. Cooper is author of five books on new product management, including the popular "Winning at New Products" which has become the bible for firms implementing a Stage Gate TM Process.

Feature Presentation:
Accelerating Time-to-Peak Sales: Leveraging Lessons Learned in Other Industries
Preston G. Smith

Although pharmaceutical development has its own distinct challenges, acceleration techniques proven successful in other large-company, high-tech environments are adaptable to drug development:

ŸOvercoming delays in the fuzzy front end
ŸStaffing teams to balance speed with budget
ŸTransferring knowledge swiftly and effectively across functions
ŸEnhancing communication across dispersed teams through partial
co- location and clear protocols
ŸApplying the cost of delay clearly and consistently
ŸViewing phase transitions from a cost-benefit perspective

Preston G. Smith, New Product Dynamics, co-author, Developing Products in Half the Time: New Rules, New Tools leads this featured presentation. Preston has twenty years of industrial experience with IBM, AT&T, GM, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft and has worked exclusively on accelerated product development for over ten years. Preston's expertise is in diagnosing the weaknesses in a company's development cycle, facilitating the implementation of accelerated development methods and associated training. He has led over a hundred seminars on fast cycle product development in the U.S. and abroad and has taught product development courses at three universities. In addition to publishing numerous articles on the techniques of speeding up product development, Preston is author (with Donald Reinersten) of Developing Products in Half the Time, a practical guide to fast cycle approaches.

FAQ

Who Should Attend?
This conference is designed for VPs, Directors and Senior Managers of:
Ÿ Project Planning
Ÿ Product Development
Ÿ R&D
Ÿ Drug Development
Ÿ Strategic Planning
Ÿ Portfolio Management
Ÿ Project and Program Management

Why This Conference is Important to You.
This conference is designed to address the inherent difficulties (what some may call impossibilities) of transforming from a functional to cross-functional organization. Overcoming slowdowns that occur while transferring knowledge and technology between functions is one of the main issues for discussion. In addition to tackling the problem of building and maintaining cross-functional teams, strategies to link well-developed functional groups and equally strong cross-functionality are emphasized. There is no silver bullet. It's important to build on existing functional excellence.

One of the respondents to the advance letter explaining the idea behind this meeting noted that, "team is a term that is thrown around a lot…my sense is that groups of people seldom really function as a team." Furthering that notion in Developing Products In Half the Time, co-authors Reinertsten and Smith highlight that "teams and team building are overused terms in the current management lexicon, so they have lost their meaning". Different meanings applied to "team members" in various organizations make it important to distinguish the characteristics that set rapid development teams apart. On day two of the conference, Preston Smith will provide insight into improving speed to market through staffing teams to balance speed with budget, transferring knowledge swiftly and effectively across functions, and enhancing communication across dispersed teams through partial co-location and clear protocols.

Greater cross-functional coordination and communication result in clearer project prioritization and faster and better decision making. Some of the biggest opportunities for improvement lie in the processes for project selection, go/kill decisions and project prioritization & resource allocation. The keynote speech by Dr. Robert G. Cooper (author of Portfolio Management for New Products and pioneer of Stage Gate methodologies) focuses on new product portfolio management and Stage Gate processes. A cross-functional method for project prioritization is essential if all involved departments are to have the same development priorities and rankings. A cross-functional game plan for success - a Stage-GateTM roadmap that charts the way from idea through to launch and integrates the key functions in the innovation process is provided. (Cooper is developer of the Stage-Gate process, now employed by leading firms around the world to get new products to market quickly and effectively).

In addition to these special presentations you will have the opportunity to listen to four case studies presented by pharmaceutical companies. Each will point out, in practice, the issues we are working through in the featured and plenary sessions. The case studies will help you interpret and think about implementation.

The plenary sessions are designed to discuss the bricks and mortar of improving cross-functional performance. There are two plenary sessions.

Session I: Building and Maintaining Cross-Functional Teams
ŸOrganization structures
Ÿ Matrix Management
Ÿ Dealing with Conflict

Session II: Monitoring and Tracking Cross-Functional Performance
ŸResource Forecasting
Ÿ Budgeting
Ÿ Project Management Software

Overall, Improving Cross-Functional Performance in Pharmaceutical Development is an unprecedented opportunity to discuss and resolve the issues that have stood in the way of making smarter and swifter decisions across the product lifecycle. It provides clarity and direction on communication and management strategies to help free up resources, reduce wasteful activities and optimize efficiencies, create real value and dramatically improve profits.

Advisory Board

Jeff Antos
President
Beacon Hill Technologies, Inc.

Charles T. Gombar, Ph.D. Sr. Dir.,
Project Management, Neuroscience
Wyeth-Ayerst Research

Jane Bainbridge
Vice President,
Global Project Manager
Pharmacia Corporation

Susan T. Hall, Ph.D.
U.S. Site Dir., World Wide Project Planning
GlaxoSmithKline

Janet Foulkes, B.Sc., M.B.A.
Senior Director/
Group Leader, MSO
Pfizer, Inc.
Kenneth I Kaitin, Ph.D.
Director
Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development

Additional Feedback About the Conference
If you have any remaining thoughts about the conference, would like to inquire about speaking opportunities or how we can continue to improve the value our programs offer to you, please feel free to express your input to us in an e-mail or give us a call at 1-800-338-2223.
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